Articles

Kubjikaa the Erotic Goddess
Goddess Kubjika
Written By Dr. Dyczkowski
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The Cult of the Goddess Kubjika
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Written By Dr. Dyczkowski
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The Inner Pilgrimage of the Tantras
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Written By Dr. Dyczkowski
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Khacakrapancakastotra and Mahanayaprakaasa
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Written By Dr. Dyczkowski
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Self Awareness and Egoity
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Written By Dr. Dyczkowski
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Swagatham to the Journey
angkor-wat-142391
Introduction to Anuttara Trika Kula based on a recent lecture by Dr. Dyczkowski.
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Goddess Kubjika
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Article on Mother Kubjika and her immense metaphysical depth.
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Abhinavagupta's Primary Works
KalaBhairavDarbarSquare
A short exploration into works of Abhinava & the importance of Tantraloka.
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One Reply to “Articles”

  1. Dear Mark,

    I know you are a busy man, but if you ever get the chance, I wonder if you could clear up a question I have concerning the concept of free will with regards to Kashmir Shaivism vs Advaita Vedanta – in particular in relation to the individual Atman of the apparent person/jiva.

    Advaita Vedanta posits a purely inert consciousness, so it must postulate a (somehow external) ‘field of ignorance’ for consciousness to interact with to make anything happen.

    In the same way, the Atman of the individual is also said to be inert, and requires this field of ignorance/Maya, in the form of the mind/intellect etc to do anything.

    Now, it seems to me that Kashmir Shavism offers a far more sensible ontology, where Brahman/Shiva is both inactive and active, and ‘Maya’ is nothing other than the dynamic aspect of consciousness manifesting.

    I am trying to establish how this translates on the individual level as far as what we would refer to in the west as ‘free will’? Does the individual ‘atman’ initiate action?

    The purely inert vision of consciousness as promoted by advaita has never appealed to me, and seems to be missing something. It seems to me that consciousness must also be active, both in terms of the entire creation, but also on the individual level of the apparent individual being.

    In advaita, we are told ‘you are not the doer’, stating that we are essentially robots pushed around by this out outside agency of ‘maya’.

    I’ve noticed the teaching that ‘you are not the doer’ also appears in Kashmir shaivism, but I suspect that the meaning is different. I get the impression that in kashmir shaivism, what they mean by this is that it is god who is the doer, both on the level of the entire creation but also on the individual level, but then this is leads on to the realisation that you are god, so you are the doer after all, but maybe just not the doer you thought you were!

    Thank you for any clarification you can provide no whether this is on the right tack or not!

    Regards,

    Douglas

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